Double Vision Diplopia: Alex Garant is the “Queen of Double Eyes”

By on May 28, 2015

William Shakespeare may not have actually written that the “eyes are the window to the soul” (although it’s often attributed to him), but he did write this: “Sometimes from her eyes, I did receive fair speechless messages” (The Merchant of Venice, Act I, scene 1, line 163), and we can’t imagine the fair speechless messages that one might get from these beautiful portrait paintings by Canadian artist Alex Garant, Queen of Double Eyes.

We’re so taken with Garant’s surrealistic women with multiple eyes (and there are some here with more than double eyes, actually) that we wanted to share them with you. These visually arresting images might be what you would see if you were suffering from diplopia — a visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one — but the point here is that we’re supposed to see beyond their physical beauty, to look at their faces, and into their eyes, and realize that our own vision — and how we interpret what we see — is more than just an optical illusion: what we’re seeing might be a mirror of our own repetitive patterns of thinking. That’s our interpretation anyway, we could be wrong.

Her website‘s bio says: “Queen of Double Eyes, Alex Garant studied visual arts at Notre-Dame–De-Foy College just outside Quebec City. After graduating in 2001, she ultimately settled in Toronto, Canada. Her oil paintings offer a graphic quality combined with traditional portrait techniques. Garant finds inspiration in early ink printing, vintage pop surrealism, baroque tapestries and retro kitsch. She uses patterns, duplication of elements, symmetry and image superposition as a way to engage the viewer into her imagery.”

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About Bryan

Bryan Thomas has been a freelancing writer/critic for All Music Guide and a dozen other websites and zines, most of them long gone. He’s also worked for over twenty years at reissue record labels, and penned scads of liner notes -- prior to that he worked in bookstores and record stores, going all the way back to the original vinyl daze. He is now somewhat reclusive and bides his time quietly in his dusty Miracle Mile hermitage in Los Angeles, CA.