François Vautier’s stunning tribute to Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner”

By on June 8, 2015

This experimental short film by François Vautier is a stunning tribute to Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, made as a unique picture with a resolution of 3.6 gigapixels, it uses 167,819 frames from Blade Runner: The Final Cut.

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Vautier explains how he did it here:

1> First Step : The “Picture” of the film I extracted the 167,819 frames from ‘Blade Runner’ (final cut version,1h51mn52s19i). Then I assembled all these images to obtain one gigantic image of colossal dimensions : a square of approximately 60,000 pixels on one side alone, 3.5 gigapixels (3500 million pixels)

2> Second Step : An Illusion: I placed a virtual camera above this big picture. So what you see is like an illusion, because contrary to appearances there is only one image. It is in fact the relative movement of the virtual camera flying over this massive image which creates the animated film, like a film in front of a projector.

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He talks about it here too, but it’s in French and we have no idea what he’s saying!:

Here’s his official bio:

After graduating from Fine Arts, François Vautier worked with contemporary art galleries in Paris. Then he embarked upon a collaboration with ARTE (a European television network) and produced a number of emissions for French television stations. Connecting with Raphael Nadjari he continued to produce highly creative opening titles and his first feature film: the thriller “le P’tit Bleu”. His second feature film “Déjà Vu” is a science fiction film. The story of a teenager in a futuristic fable where the reality merges with the virtual. He then prolongs the exploration of “Parallel Worlds” in the realization of “Twenty Show“, the first user generated film. His work was presented at the WORLD EXPO Shanghai 2010.

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About Bryan

Bryan Thomas has been a freelancing writer/critic for All Music Guide and a dozen other websites and zines, most of them long gone. He’s also worked for over twenty years at reissue record labels, and penned scads of liner notes -- prior to that he worked in bookstores and record stores, going all the way back to the original vinyl daze. He is now somewhat reclusive and bides his time quietly in his dusty Miracle Mile hermitage in Los Angeles, CA.