“The Story Of Bottled Water”: Take 8 Minutes To Learn Why You Should Ditch The Plastic

By on April 21, 2015

We thought we’d take a moment out from all the fun and frivolity here on Night Flight to share with you this wonderful short film about bottled water, written and directed by Louis Fox, with additional writing from Annie Leonard and Jonah Sachs, and produced by Free Range Studios for The Story Of Stuff, one of our favorite websites.

Recently, on World Water Day, we told you about some of the problems we’re facing with water shortages, and we also told you about Charity: Water’s many solutions for providing clean drinking water around the world. We’ve also told you about Boyan Slat’s Ocean Cleanup, “the world’s first feasible concept to clean the oceans of plastic.”

BOTTLED WATER 3

We think it’s an important issue for every person to the world — maybe the most important, since we all need water to survive on this planet —  and we’ll continue to find ways to bring you interesting videos about the access to clean drinking water, but also we think everyone should be conscious of the consequences of making poor decisions about the purchase of individual plastic water bottles, and that’s why you should take a look at this Story Of Stuff short film. Here’s a bit more:

The Story of Bottled Water, released on March 22, 2010 (World Water Day), employs the Story of Stuff style to tell the story of manufactured demand—how you get Americans to buy more than half a billion bottles of water every week when it already flows virtually free from the tap. Over five minutes, the film explores the bottled water industry’s attacks on tap water and its use of seductive, environmental-themed advertising to cover up the mountains of plastic waste it produces. The film concludes with a call for viewers to make a personal commitment to avoid bottled water and support public investment in clean, available tap water for all.

BOTTLED WATER 2

BOTTLED WATER 1

About Bryan

Bryan Thomas has been a freelancing writer/critic for All Music Guide and a dozen other websites and zines, most of them long gone. He’s also worked for over twenty years at reissue record labels, and penned scads of liner notes -- prior to that he worked in bookstores and record stores, going all the way back to the original vinyl daze. He is now somewhat reclusive and bides his time quietly in his dusty Miracle Mile hermitage in Los Angeles, CA.